Rise of the ‘nan van’

New RACQ research has found nearly one in three Queensland cars with child seats installed is being driven by grandparents.

RACQ’s Lauren Ritchie said the rise of the ‘nan van’ had come as a result of more grandparents helping with childcare.

“This is a trend we weren’t seeing even 20 years ago, but it now seems to be much more common for grandparents to be more involved in many areas of their grandchildren’s lives, including ferrying them about in their own cars,” Ms Ritchie said.

there were important safety checks families and grandparents should know about if they were considering using ‘nan's van’ as a regular form of transport for young children

Ms Ritchie said there were important safety checks families and grandparents should know about if they were considering using ‘nan’s van’ as a regular form of transport for young children.

“Laws and safety regulations are quite different now to when grandparents were raising their own children, so it’s vital to read up on the latest requirements and make sure you’re well across them,” she said.

“Your grandchild’s age and size can make a difference to the type of car seat required.”

Ms Ritchie said it was important parents and grandparents knew how to properly install child restraints.

“If a car seat isn’t fitted properly you can risk injury and even death in the event of a crash,” Ms Ritchie said.

“Always read the instructions with the restraint and the vehicle manufacturer’s handbook to ensure you are installing the restraint in the appropriate way for your type of car.

“It’s always a good idea to have your restraint professionally installed or learn from experts.”

Watch RACQ’s video on installing car seats below.