The fruit, veggies and herbs you should be planting in your garden now

Here's an easy guide to fruit and vegetable that will thrive in your garden right now, according to Queensland weather conditions.

Here in Queensland, things heat up early. Don’t delay when planting your warm season favourites. Be prepare to create shade for sensitive plants and focus on the heat loving plants as listed below.

Subtropical climate

For those who live in subtropical climates like that of south-east Queensland and parts of northern New South Wales, here are some plants that are most likely to thrive in your backyard.

Herbs: basil, chives, coriander, fennel, gotu kola, heliotrope, lemongrass, mint, parsley, tarragon and winter savoury.

Fruit and vegetables: artichoke, beans, capsicum, celery, Chinese cabbage, cucumber, eggplant, kohlrabi, leek, lettuce, melons, okra, onion, potato, rosella, silver beet, spring onion, squash, sweet corn, sweet potato and tomato.

Most valuable players: for those less adventurous gardeners, tomatoes are your best bet in sub-tropical summer. Sweet potato is another easy winner for those newly greened thumbs.

Beware of: possums and scrub turkeys are out in full force at this time of year and can pose a definite threat to your vegetables particularly.

Wet and dry tropical climate

In tropical areas such as north Queensland the weather is hot and humid. The extreme heat and summer storms can be volatile for your plants. Here are some suggestions for plants most likely to withstand these conditions.

Herbs: Basil, coriander, lemongrass, mint and tarragon.

Fruit and vegetables: artichoke, beetroot, capsicum, cauliflower, celery, Chinese cabbage, cucumber, eggplant, lettuce, pumpkin, radish, shallots, spring onion and tomato.

Most valuable players: basil, sweet corn and eggplant are all sturdy heat-loving plants.

Beware of: pests such as caterpillars love the warm humid conditions at this time of year. Invest in some quality natural pesticides to protect your plants and vegetables.

Dry inland climate

Summer in the outback regional Queensland is not the best time for planting vegetables, due to the incredibly dry conditions. For those who reside in regional areas, it is better to wait for milder weather in March before planting herbs and vegetables.